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15 November 2012

Henry Blethyn: apprentice on the Submission

Henry Blethyn is a bit of an enigma to many Blevins researchers. Little is known of his life, but his emigration to the American colonies is well documented. He was an apprentice on William Penn's ship the Submission, which departed from Liverpool on 5 July 1682.

The Sailing of the Ship "Submission" in the Year 1682, with a True Copy of the Vessel's Log.

L. Taylor Dickson

The log of the ship “ Submission,” of which the following is a copy, commences the fourth day of the week, sixth day of the seventh month (September) and ends on the seventh day of the week, the twenty-first day of the eighth month, 1682. The vessel at this day being near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, which appears by the entry made on the nineteenth day of October, at which time the odor from the pines was noticed, “supposing ourselves not to be within 80 leagues.” Phineas Pemberton in his record states that they arrived in the Choptank, Maryland, on the second day of ninth month, 1682, thus making the voyage in fifty-eight days from port to port, the last days of the passage not being recorded in the log.
As Captain Settle was bound for another port, and the weather being overcast, it is highly probable that upon the twenty-first day of the seventh month he did not know where he was, and therefore did not complete the log.
Many of the passengers remained in Maryland for a considerable time (some of them married there), and then walked to Appoquinimink, the lowest section of New Castle County, about forty miles from the place of landing, and twenty miles south of the established town of New Castle.
The most important colonists on the “Submission,” judging from their respective positions in after-life, were: Phineas Pemberton and Randle (or Randolph) Blackshaw. Pemberton states in his record that the Blackshaws arrived in Appoquinimink on the fifteenth day of eleventh month, 1683. And as James Harrison, Phineas Pemberton, James Clayton, Randle Blackshaw and Ellis Jones with their families were residents of Bucks County in 1684, it is evident that they did not remain in the lower county long. The voyage across the Atlantic had been a most trying one to the passengers, due principally to the severe exactions of the Master, James Settle, but partly from the fact that many of them had over-invested in that commodity of the time known as “servants,” [1] so much so that their funds became exhausted and Randle Blackshaw was compelled to sell in Maryland Eleonore, the wife of Roger Bradbury,[2] together with her three sons, so as to liquidate his indebtedness to the Captain and enable him to reach the Quaker province on the Delaware. Much information can be obtained of these people and of their lives and form of transportation from the Choptank to Bucks County. Of the passengers other than those settled in Bucks County possibly the most interesting to the genealogist are the daughter and step-daughters of Dr. Thomas Wynne, Rebecca Winn and Marjory and Jane Mede. Hannah Logan Smith commits an error when she states that Elizabeth, the second wife of Thomas Wynne, came in this ship with their children, for as her name does not appear in the list of passengers, it is fair to presume she came with her husband in the “Welcome.” This mistake could be easily made when we consider that the vessels made the voyage at the same time. Rebecca, daughter of Thomas Wynne, married first Solomon Thomas, and secondly John Dickinson. Marjory Mede, his step daughter, married Thomas Fisher (whose descendants are numerous), and Jane Mede married and died probably without surviving children. From the Bucks County Friends Record it would appear that Robert Bond died seventh month, sixteenth, 1684; that Jane Lyon married Richard Lundy fourth month, twenty-fourth, 1691, and that Phoebe Blackshaw became the wife of Joseph Kirkbride on the thirteenth day of first month, 1688. Neither of the company’s servants appear on the records, and the name of Jane clif Hodges in Pen1berton’s list looks more like F arclif Hodges, although it may be Francis, but not Harriet as printed in the Pennsylvania Magazine, Vol. IX. There are a number of books and manuscripts in the library of the Pennsylvania Historical Society[3] that throw much light on the lives of these early emigrants, from which much genealogical information could be obtained.

The Log or THE “ Submission.”
Voyage of the Submission from Liverpool to Pennsylvania 1682.

An acct of our passage towards Pennsylvania the passengers Subscribers, went Abord the vessel Submission from the port of Liverpoole on the [5th day of the 7th month] (NOTE: Tuesday, 5 September 1682/Julian, 9/15/1682/Gregorian) 1862. The master’s name James Settle, the mate Samuel Rigg—Brian Fleetwood the Carpenter, Anthony Busshell the cooper, Ellijah Cobham, Thomas Bullock, Peter Travis, John Royle, Thomas Hateley, servants. Henry Blivin, Michael Colon, apprentices.
Free passengers of Lancashire:
  • James Harrison 54 years
  • Anna Harrison 58 years
  • Agnes Harrison 80
  • Richard Radclif 21
  • Robert Bond 14
  • Joseph Steward 14½
  • Phineas Pembcrton 32½
  • Phebe Pembcrton 22½
  • Abigail Pemberton 2
  • Ralph Pemberton 70
  • Joseph Mather 18
  • Joseph Pemberton 16 weeks
  • Lydia Wharmsby
  • Elizabeth Bradbury 16
  • Allis Dickinson
  • Jane Lyon 16½
Free passengers of Cheshire:
  • James Clayton 50
  • Jane Clayton 48
  • James Clayton 16
  • Sarah Clayton 14
  • John Clayton 11
  • Mary Clayton 8
  • Joseph Clayton 5
  • Lydia Cleaton 5
  • Randulph Blackshaw 60
  • Allis Blackshaw 43
  • Phebe Blackshaw 16
  • Sarah Blackshaw 14
  • Abraham Blackshaw 10
  • Jacob Blackshaw 8
  • Mary Blackshaw 6
  • Nehemiah Blackshaw 3
  • Martha Blackshaw 1
  • His servants:
  • Roger Bradbury 49
  • Ellenor Bradbury 46
  • Jacob Bradbury 18
  • Martha Bradbury 14
  • Joseph Bradbury 10
  • Sarah Bradbury 8
  • Roger Bradbury 2
  • From Wales:
  • Ellis Jones 45
  • Jane Jones 40
  • Barbary Jones 13
  • Dorothy Jones
  • Mary Jones 12½
  • Isaac Jones (4 months)
  • Rebeckah Winn 20
  • Jane Made 15
  • Marjory Mede 11½ 
whole passengers 37, heads 49, hed the owners servants for sale Janeclif Hodges & Ellen Holland.
[Note: a link in the original post to a map of the route has been removed because it is permanently broken]
  • 4-6 (Wednesday, 6 September/Julian - 16 September/Gregorian)1682 about 4 afternoon set sails & came to an anker black Rock about 6 from whence & sent 3 letters by boat one Roger Longworth one for Henry Haydock one for Thomas Jonjois about one in the morning I sail & came that night to an anker about 7 betwixt Hollyhead and Beaumorris
  • 5-7 (Thursday, 7 September/Julian, 17 September/Gregorian) about 12 in the morning set sails & the wind came south & put us a little to the north till about 10 in the morning then it came no-west & we came about Hollyhead & left sight of it yt night 
  • 6-8 (Friday, 8 September/Julian, 18 September/Gregorian) that night over agt Waterford fair wether
  • 7-9 (Saturday, 9 September/Julian, 19 September/Gregorian) A misty day Becalmed
  • 1-10 (Sunday, 10 September/Julian, 20 September/Gregorian) A clear day the wind easterly in the morning on east Waterford
  • 2-11 (Monday, 11 September/Julian, 21 September/Gregorian) A fair day wind easterly at 10 in ye morning on east Kingssale
  • 3-12 (Tuesday, 12 September/Julian, 22 September/Gregorian) in the forenoon left sight of Cape Clear
  • 4-13 (Wednesday, 13 September/Julian, 23 September/Gregorian) the wind south-westerly
  • 5-14 (Thursday, 14 September/Julian, 24 September/Gregorian) Wind S W that day we spoke with A ship from East India bound for London, that we went about 75 leagues from the Capes
  • 6-15 (Friday, 15 September/Julian, 25 September/Gregorian) becalmed
  • 7-16 (Saturday, 16 September/Julian, 26 September Gregorian) A high wind much westerly that day we saw at A distance A whale
  • 1-17 (Sunday, 17 September/Julian, 27 September/Gregorian) A high wind westerly in the afternoon A whale came neare us & appeared fair to us & followed us some time
  • 2-18 (Monday, 18 September/Julian, 28 September/Gregorian) The wind much westerly about 12 in the night there arose A great storm that day were forced to take of the main top & to lay the ship by for about 10 hours the sea was exceedingly high ye waves ran as high as the main yards but we received little damage
  • 3-19 (Tuesday, 19 September/Julian, 29 September/Gregorian) in the afternoon the wind S west
  • 4-20 (Wednesday 20 September/Julian, 30 September/Gregorian) about four in the morning the wind n west the day fair
  • 5-21(Thursday, 21 September/Julian, 1 October/Gregorian) Wind N W day cold
  • 6-22 (Friday, 22 September/Julian, 2 October/Gregorian) Wind N W very cold & stormy
  • 7-23 (Saturday, 23 September/Julian, 3 October/Gregorian) Wind N W very cold & stormy
  • 1-24 (Sunday, 24 September/Julian, 4 October/Gregorian) Wind N W a calm day & cleare
  • 2-25 (Monday, 25 September/Julian, 5 October/Gregorian) A calm day & cleare
  • 3-26 (Tuesday, 26 September/Julian, 6 October/Gregorian) becalmed most of the day in the afternoon wind S W in 48 degrees 31 minutes no latitude
  • 4-27 (Wednesday, 27 September/Julian, 7 October/Gregorian) The wind westerly at night wind high in 48 degrees & 20 minutes about 15 degrees in longitude from the Cape
  • 5-28 (Thursday, 28 September/Julian, 8 October/Gregorian) The wind westerly till evening no-east
  • 6-29 (Friday, 29 September/Julian, 9 October/Gregorian) Westerly and cold
  • 7-30 (Saturday, 30 September/Julian, 10 October/Gregorian) about 11 in the forenoon we saw a ship about 12 we saw 14 ? one company about 3 in the afternoon we saw a ship all supposed to be a French ship
  • 1-1,8mos (Sunday, 1 October/Julian, 11 October/Gregorian) the wind N W at night was high & the sea very [---?]
  • 2-2 (Monday, 2 October/Julian, 12 October/Gregorian) the sea] very rough the wind high about 4 in the [---?] dyed Abraham the son of Randulph Blackshaw about 6 in the morning A great head sea broke over the ship & staved the boat & took the most part of it away, broke up the main hatches that were both nailed & corked & took them away that they were not seen where they went, broke the boat's mast & hyst that were lashed in the mid ship, broke of the gunnell head in the midship & broke the forre shet & took severall things of the decks & severall things that were in the boat it cast betwix decks. At 9 in the morning the boy was put overboard, about 4 in the afternoon A great sea fell on our Rudder & broke it about 1 yard or Something more from the head, was again pieced as well as it cold that nigl1t—not being discovered until about 10 at night & was made pretty firm the next day
  • 3-3 (Tuesday, 3 October/Julian, 13 October/Gregorian) The Sea rough
  • 4-4 (Wednesday, 4 October/Julian, 14 October/Gregorian) The Sea indeferent high the wind calme
  • 5-5 (Thursday, 5 October/Julian, 15 October/Gregorian) The wind No-E.
  • 6-6 (Friday, 6 October/Julian, 16 October/Gregorian) The day faire wind easterly
  • 7-7 (Saturday, 7 October/Julian, 17 October/Gregorian) day faire wind N E. . 
  • 1-8 (Sunday, 8 October/Julian, 18 October/Gregorian) A fresh gale N, we Saw a whale. . 
  • 2-9 (Monday, 9 October/Julian, 19 October/Gregorian) faire wether and wind, hundreds of porpoises about the ship some leaped high out of the water and fol lowed the ship about an hour
  • 3-10 (Tuesday, 10 October/Julian, 20 October/Gregorian) faire wether and Wind, this morning we saw another great school of porpoises in 30 degrees 57 minutes no latitude
  • 4-11 (Wednesday, 11 October/Julian, 21 October /Gregorian)The day faire, the wind East this day we spoke with a New England ship bound for Lisbourne
  • 5-12 (Thursday, 12 October/Julian, 22 October/Gregorian) The wind Southerly extraordinary hot
  • 6-13 (Friday, 13 October/Julian, 23 October/Gregorian) in the morning the wind S. E. with raine from 8 in morning to 4 in the afternoon that day was scene in the great raine at the ship’s side blood half compas of the ship
  • 7-14 (Saturday, 14 October/Julian, 24 October/Gregorian) at twelve in the morning it began to raine and continued showering all day, the sea rough, the wind northerly and N.N.E.
  • 1-15 (Sunday, 15 October/Julian, 25 October/Gregorian) the wind easterly the day faire. winds and wether good in 37 : 46 minutes latitude and 31 de 48 minutes Longitude
  • 2-16 (Monday, 16 October/Julian, 26 October/Gregorian) day and wind faire. At evening it began to lighten & continued
  • 3-17 (Tuesday, 17 October/Julian, 27 October/Gregorian) lightened all day & night but little raine to us
  • 4-18 (Wednesday, 18 October/Julian, 28 October/Gregorian) faire this morning the wind being west we smelled the pines, supposing ourselves not to be within 80 leagues
  • 5-19 (Thursday, 19 October/Julian, 29 October/Gregorian) this day faire till evening it begun to blow wind S W
  • 6-20 (Friday, 20 October/Julian, 30 October/Gregorian) raine some pte of the day.

Notes:

  1. Many of those registered as servants appear to be closely related to and quite the equal of their masters, and had been influenced to emigrate on account of the liberal inducements offered by the Proprietor; for even before this time we find in the Upland court records the sale of William Still, tailor, for four years to Captain Edmund Cantwell. And a short time after this the clergyman at New Castle in a letter states that they have lost their schoolmaster, but that he can be replaced, as he learns that a vessel is shortly to arrive, when he will go to the dock and buy one. And it is also stated that no less a person than a distinguished signer of the Declaration of Independence was sold in his youth as a servant and after the expiration of his time taught school.
  2. As the name of Bradbury does not appear among the residents of Bucks County it is to be presumed that the entire family remained in Maryland.
  3. The most interesting are the records of Phineas Pernberton, printed in Volume IX of the Pennsylvania Magazine, and his book of ear-marks of the cattle and horses made in 1684.

Sources:

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